All about ‘Arabs’ – Buchkunst News

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The history of nations is full of prejudice and ignorance of one another, although they have lived side by side and are intertwined. However, cultural and economic transitions leave serious traces in many areas, especially in the language. In fact, sometimes there is such confusion that it is impossible to tell the other without one. Turks, Iranians and Arabs are like that. With Islam, religion, language, culture, social life and even the destiny of these three nations were mixed. But precisely because of power struggles and power struggles, the peoples diverge unintentionally. The wave of nationalism that developed after the French Revolution further deepened divisions. We have long harbored prejudices against the Arabs, who have long been an integral part of the Ottoman Empire. The same goes for them. Do historical original studies as well as art and literature remove this thick residue? It’s hard to predict. Although Tim Mackintosh-Smith did not write his book The Arabs for this purpose, the content is thought provoking and instructive. It is an original work, presented to understand a nation, not to praise, defend or propagate it.

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“Arabs” is a work based on space, language and the vision of the future. How the language, over the course of three millennia, created a nation (with many inner strata) crystallized through poetry, and the results of the language’s universal influence gained with the advent of Islam are particularly striking. Hertz. By stating that Muhammad’s appearance “coincided with the midpoint of recorded Arab history,” Smith deepens his research by drawing on linguistics, anthropology, cultural history, philosophy, and history. He interprets the Qur’an’s crucial role as “a linguistic nationality that unites divided lines around the Arabic language”. He emphasizes that he is “not just the guardian of local marginal cults, but a pioneer of a global culture”. He emphasizes that Arabic not only played a founding role in the middle of the desert, but also mobilized Arabic-speaking communities, that unlike ancient civilizations, “material buildings in Arabia were rare” and instead “almost the only Arabic man-made poetry” came to the fore . He says Arab history is about “friends, not maps,” and that poetry ferments the nature of companionship. He uses “camel”, which has almost a thousand words in Arabic, in a completely different place. According to him, “in a way, Arabization is thanks to the camel.” The word ‘Arabs’, which also means ‘rabble’ in ancient etymology, is defined elsewhere as ‘people divided, joined together and mixed’. In a world with no shortage of “intriguing mirages,” it makes sense that the idea of ​​unity persists today.

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The author of English origin, who lives in Yemen, not only writes the three-thousand-year history of Arabic in an academic language as an “Anglo-Arab world expert”. He doesn’t hesitate to comment. At times he constructs sentences that can be described as poetic, as if connecting to the eternal relationship that Arabic has with poetry. There is no political or sectarian background in what they write. It also seeks to convey back to the Qur’an the spirit of the communities of the Arabian Peninsula, which first mixed with each other and then with other languages ​​and nations. The ideal of achieving cultural and political unity from an ethnic composition is filtered. One of the books that offers an opportunity to understand Arabs and Islam and read them from a different perspective is Arabs.

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ARABES – TRIBIAS, TRIBE
THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF HISTORY OF STATES AND STATES
Tim Mackintosh-Smith
Translated by Nurettin Elhuseyni
JKY, 2022
640 pages.

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